Introduced Landmark Civil Rights Legislation

The Equality Act, which Jared worked on with Rep. John Lewis, will prohibit anti-LGBTQ discrimination in employment, education, credit, public accommodations, housing, and more.

Led Effort to Repeal Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell

Jared worked across the aisle to eliminate the discriminatory ban on openly gay military service members, and he’s fighting back against Trump’s despicable ban on transgender Americans serving in the military.

Helped Pass Improved Violence Against Women Act

The bipartisan 2013 law included new protections for LGBTQ survivors of domestic violence, as well as improved protections for Native American and immigrant survivors.

Worked with President Obama to Pass LGBTQ-Inclusive Hate Crimes Law

Federal law now recognizes hate crimes motivated by gender, sexual orientation, and gender identity.

Stood up for LGBTQ Immigrants Facing Deportation

Jared spoke out against the practice of sending LGBTQ immigrants back to hostile nations, called on immigration officials to stop separating same-gender couples, and demanded that ICE work to prevent gender-based violence in detention facilities.

Wrote the Student Non-Discrimination Act

The bill aims to end the discrimination and bullying that countless LGBTQ students face during the school day.

Worked to End Anti-LGBTQ Discrimination in the Workplace

In addition to sponsoring the Employment Non-Discrimination Act, Jared urged President Obama to issue an executive order prohibiting discrimination by federal contractors — which President Obama did in 2015.

Helped Launch the LGTB Equality Caucus

In 2008, Jared became the first openly gay man elected to Congress. Under Jared’s leadership, the LGBT Equality Caucus transformed into a political powerhouse that elevates LGBTQ identities in the halls of Congress.

Co-Founded the Transgender Equality Task Force

“Too many times, the ‘T’ in ‘LGBT’ has been an afterthought,” Jared declared at a national press conference.

Fought for Marriage Equality

Jared fought for years for marriage-equality legislation, and after the Obergefell victory in 2015, he and his family celebrated on the Supreme Court steps.

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